Amplify Jive Social Business Interaction with Real-Time Collaboration

Back in the day, employees gathered around the corporate water cooler to chat about everything from brainstorming the next great product innovation or closing on loose ends from the last team meeting. Regardless of the topic of discussion, the water cooler was a place where people connected with one another. In this simple way, team-based productivity was organically amplified, synergizing workers and increasing productivity. Such gatherings of like-minded individuals were often the spark that ignited innovative business strategies.

This idea carries through to today’s work environments, where quality team-based productivity begins when companies increase the ability for individuals to connect with one another. This can be a challenge, however, with remote and mobile employees often outnumbering their office-based associates. Enabling employee conversations and video collaboration is just as vital to business objectives today as it was decades ago when the water cooler brought workers together. Now, however, companies must think outside of the box to keep employees connected.

Developing this capacity requires real-time communications solutions—enhanced with HD-quality and multipoint video conferencing. This technology enables modern day remote/mobile working teams to still have valuable collaboration experiences no matter where they are or from which devices they’re working. Just think about your own work style: chances are you and most of your peers already use video technologies at home, making it all the easier to quickly join a real time video session from whatever business communications process you’re using.

More and more people today are working in cloud applications vs. on-premise desktop applications. In fact a recent study by the 451 Group found that 45% of global enterprises are running production level cloud apps, and users want their communication tools available inside these apps. Recognizing this great need, Esna, the leader in embedded real-time collaboration, and Vidyo, the leader in software based video collaboration, have partnered up to bring business leaders and their teams the best of both worlds.

Esna’s mission is to enable users with the ability to communicate and collaborate with their peers, customers and partners without having to toggle in and out of different applications. We embed real-time collaboration into the cloud apps that people use everyday like Salesforce, Google Apps for Work, and now integrates the VidyoWorks™ platform with Jive Software to provide a scalable, affordable, unparalleled visual communications experience over any IP network, with just a click of a button.

Esna iLink for Vidyo

Esna iLink for Vidyo allows users to seamlessly join a conference with the click of a button.

Esna iLink for Vidyo seamlessly embeds the power of Vidyo’s software based platform inside Jive. With iLink for Vidyo, users can simply “click to Vidyo” to start and join video conferences with participants inside and outside their organization. They will also be able to:

  • Start an instant conference with any Jive user from their contact card or profile page
  • Initiate a conference with group members in a Jive group
  • Start a conference with co-authors from any Jive document
  • Post a conference with links into the Jive activity stream

Customers can expect to see Esna iLink for Vidyo integrated with Jive at JiveWorld 2014, taking place October 21-23 at the Cosmopolitan Las Vegas. iLink for Vidyo will be demonstrated in Esna booth S4 and Vidyo booth TS11. The solution is currently available as beta – click here for a free trial.

Esna takes pride in partnering with transformative industry leaders such as Vidyo who are fiercely committed to delivering on team connectivity. Jive is just the first of a variety of cloud applications in which Esna will be embedding Vidyo, so stay tuned!

Lee Ho - Vice President - Marketing, EsnaLee Ho, Vice President Marketing, Esna
Lee has nearly 20 years of leadership experience as a strategist and product pioneer in marketing, business development, product management and change facilitation. Lee has an extensive background in the creation and implementation of long-term growth strategies for enterprise solution providers.

 

Many of the products and features described herein remain in varying stages of development and will be offered on a when-and-if available basis. The product plans, pricing, specifications, and descriptions are provided for information only and are subject to change without notice, and are provided without warranty of any kind, express or implied. Vidyo reserves the right to modify future product plans at any time.

Telemedicine: Increasing Access to Healthcare

DrSiddiqui2a[1]When we think about telemedicine, we generally think about equipment, space for hardware, and connectivity. Rarely, do we think about the fact that telemedicine is truly about connecting people. Telemedicine enables patients and physicians to make a connection, a human connection, and make significant decisions regarding one’s immediate or long-term health goals.

Telemedicine increases access to healthcare whether in an urban or rural setting. And nothing better demonstrates this seamless integration of people and technology than a service introduced by the California Telehealth Network, CTN Connect, based on Vidyo’s platform. With use of this service, no longer are telemedicine providers or patients thinking about boxes, equipment and locations. Instead the solution enables healthcare providers to focus more on patients and healthcare delivery.

As simple as this seems, the healthcare community and decision makers need to realize that technology fundamentally changes how we think about and how we deliver healthcare.

As a telemedicine provider for over a decade, I have been tied to my desk because of legacy video conferencing hardware. I often had to run back to my office to see patients or interact with physician colleagues due to the boundaries of older technology. Thankfully this is no longer an issue. Instead, I can now connect with hospitals, clinics and patients anytime, anywhere and on any device. With CTN Connect, I can be in my clinic using my laptop to connect with a patient, walk around the hospital and utilize my tablet to urgently see a patient in the ICU, or be at my desk and deliver a lecture to colleagues hundreds of miles away in multiple locations.

This was the vision of telemedicine that many of us have had for years and now it is a reality.

A situation that clearly demonstrates this ubiquitous access was a young patient I saw a few months ago.

Watch the video above to view this patient’s story - Alexa’s Story 1/30/14 from Vidyo Inc. on Vimeo.

On late Sunday afternoon, I received a call from the emergency department asking for anti-bacterial recommendations for a young woman with calf pain and a high fever.

After briefly speaking with the physician, I questioned the “simple” nature of the case and asked to see the patient. I utilized my tablet to connect to the emergency department and was speaking with the patient and the healthcare team instantly. Within a minute of seeing the patient, I realized that she was critically ill and, in consultation with the on site healthcare team, determined immediate surgical intervention was required.

The patient was fighting for her life as she went into surgery and continued to struggle post-operatively., But because of CTN Connect and the Vidyo platform, I was able to be at the patient’s bedside. speak with her family and work with the healthcare hospital team to deliver state-of-the art healthcare to this young women, regardless of the fact that her hospital was in a rural location.

The ease and simplicity of this telemedicine connection was due to our utilization of the CTN Connect service powered by Arkadin/Vidyo. During the days that followed and throughout this young woman’s care, we never dealt with technology or equipment hurdles. We were able to focus  on what was really important – delivering quality healthcare and focus on the patient’s wellbeing.

This is what telemedicine was meant to be.

These days we use technology in every aspect of our life: we communicate with our loved ones through texting, email and real time video conferencing, we buy clothes and groceries online, we pay bills and manage our money online. These activities represent an integration of technology in the very fabric of our daily activities.

There is no reason why technology cannot have the same impact on our healthcare delivery.

JaveedSiddiqui Javeed Siddiqui MD, MPH is the co-founder and Chief Medical Officer for TeleMed2U. In addition to being an Infectious Diseases physician, Dr. Siddiqui is a recognized medical technologist who has previously held an appointment at the School of Engineering, University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Siddiqui has been actively involved in telemedicine and telehealth since 2002 and has been recognized as a national thought leader in these fields. Dr. Siddiqui served as the Medical Director of one the nation’s top telemedicine programs at the University of California, Davis. In addition, Dr. Siddiqui was the first Medical Director of California’s Institute for Science and Innovation, The Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society [CITRIS]. Dr. Siddiqui co-founded TeleMed2U in 2010.

 

 

In My Opinion: Vidyo Goes Viral at Arizona State University

Big news for Vidyo, Inc. today in the academic world! Vidyo has partnered with Internet2, a member-owned advanced technology community founded by the nation’s leading higher education institutions, to create and provide a low-cost, subscription-based video communications service for all Internet2 university members and thousands of public K-12 schools in the United States. After a thorough trial run of the Vidyo-based solution at Arizona State, Emory and Northwestern Universities, the Vidyo NET+ Service is expected to be available for early adopter enrollments this May. Arizona State University was extremely influential making this happen; in fact, they sponsored Vidyo as a NET+ Service, based on the great experience they’ve had using Vidyo at ASU for the past several years. Accordingly, we could think of no one more appropriate to share their first-hand experience with Vidyo. The following is an account from Guy Mullins, ASU’s Director of New Media, Academic Technologies:

When we first introduced the use of Vidyo at ASU, it was for one particular purpose: a class at the School of Life Sciences in which our students in Tempe, Arizona communicated and collaborated with leading research scientists and experts from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s facilities on Barro Colorado Island, in the middle of the Panama Canal.  We needed a video communications solution that would allow students and faculty at ASU to connect easily and interact seamlessly with the Smithsonian experts in these remote tropical areas.  It was no small feat … but Vidyo well surpassed any of our expectations and news of this exceptional communications tool spread rapidly. Mainly through ‘word of mouth,’ we soon had others in our academic community requesting Vidyo and downloading the application.

To date, we’ve seen well over two thousand downloads of the Vidyo client application across our community. In terms of demand, we are about double the number of monthly client downloads over this same time last year.

With this in mind, we have started to look a bit more closely at who among our community are using Vidyo.

Based on our early analysis of our usage data mapped against our general user directories, it appears that Vidyo is still primarily a tool of the technical minded staff at ASU.  I anticipate that the next wave of adoption will come from faculty and researchers. Opening up this technology to a much broader range of users through simple-to-use and inexpensive Vidyo desktop tools, we’re finding many more rich, interesting, and innovative uses for video communications across our entire university and beyond.

We’re seeing scientists from a wide range of disciplines collaborate on research with their colleagues from around the world; we have expert guest lecturers being introduced remotely into our classrooms; field reports being filed by our broadcast journalism students; collaborations in the arts, theater, and more.  It is inspiring to see how a new technology can really have an impact in improving our teaching, learning, and research capabilities. Given the strong growth patterns of Vidyo usage , we believe we are only at the beginning of what is yet to come in terms of videoconferencing in the academic community. This global thinking has ironically also spawned some new ideas at home that we hope to explore soon; we’ve realized that our campus is large enough and diverse enough that we actually have numerous “field trip” opportunities we can engage in across campus – or even just down the hall – in which Vidyo can be utilized to bring hundreds of students into lab spaces, studios, research environments, and more.  We look forward to some of these “inside the box” approaches to deploying Vidyo to enhance our teaching and learning activities.

We are now averaging more than eleven hundred calls per month (1114 calls per month as of March 2013 – see above chart) either person-to-person or in collaborative group meetings.  That is far more than we were seeing just a short time ago, and arguably a ten–fold increase over any previous videoconferencing technology we’ve deployed in the past.  Again though, looking at our current rate of growth for Vidyo usage and adoption, I’m confident that in another year the numbers we’re seeing today will be relatively quaint by comparison.  The future of videoconferencing with Vidyo looks bright at ASU.

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Guy Mullins, Director of New Media at ASU’s University Technology Office, has over 25 years of experience in higher education media production. A focus on documentary and research production combined with networking and social media collaboration, Guy’s work blends both traditional and emerging approaches to educational media applications. Guy has a B.A. from the University of Arizona, where his studies focused on Radio & Television; minor studies include Fine Arts and Business, and a M.Ed., Arizona State University, with an emphasis in Educational Media & Computers.


 

 

 

 

In My Opinion: What the 21st Century Classroom Looks Like

Not too long ago, my six-year-old daughter wanted to make a kite, so we opened up her laptop and searched “how to make a kite” on YouTube. We had several videos to choose from on the first page of results, and my daughter soon found one that suited her purpose. Within minutes she was collecting material and pressing pause during each step in the video as she followed directions. She could rewind or play the video as she progressed, and an hour later we were testing her kite outside.

Welcome to learning in the 21st Century. Today, students learn from peers, an online community, and experts who share their knowledge through traditional and online publishing resources. University students I work with have access to more information through their cellphones than I did in my entire library as an undergrad.

Smart phones are a wakeup call to educators. The days of constructing four walls with a podium at the front and calling it a school house are over. Today’s students are highly connected and consume information when and where it’s needed. New pushes in augmented reality, combined with the possibilities of hardware like Google Glass, will change the face of education as we know it.

Unfortunately, many educators tend to focus on testing memorization skills—think every multiple choice question you ever endured–but, as Socrates lamented when writing became popular, memorization is no longer important; and the testing of memorization skills is a significant distraction in education. This reliance on a historically structured curriculum leads to one right answer, as Sir Ken Robinson says, “at the back of the book,” rather than opening up the curriculum to multiple questions, ideally generated by the students themselves.

What society needs are people who can ask good questions, come up with creative solutions, critically examine those possibilities to figure out which one creative solution is most likely to be effective, and communicate that solution effectively enough to motivate others to action. Classrooms in the 21st century will take this into account. One step in this direction is the flipped classroom, in which students watch lectures and read course material outside of class, and use class time to engage with topics and course material through small group discussion or individual projects.

The 21st Century Classroom will be a place where students move up on Bloom’s taxonomy (the new version) beyond rote memorization skills to creation skills. These classrooms will be intellectually safe, comfortable places that encourage peer interaction and tactile connections with the material students are studying (virtual or physical) because these experiences inspire creative solutions and communication skills. Successful classrooms will facilitate networking, small group collaboration, and interaction with the subject of study.

These rooms will also be highly connected. Right now campuses have WiFi available but not in all classrooms and learning spaces. New technologies will allow students and instructors to stay connected constantly. Successful educators will be the ones who can connect learning material with the visual, tactile, and social aspects of the subject: e.g., connecting students with professionals who are successful in their respective fields.

Thanks to initiatives like TedTalks and Creative Commons, students have an unprecedented opportunity to listen to lectures from individuals who are the brightest minds in their field. Students also have the ability to securely attend classes through video they may have missed due to illness, or meet with scholars and practitioners virtually as a class through software like Vidyo. Location is no longer a barrier for those who are connected. If the traditional schoolhouse is a wooden building in a field, the 21st Century Classroom is Willie Wonka’s glass elevator, able to move sideways and slantways and even travel outside the factory. The instructor’s role has moved from content deliverer to experience facilitator.

In short, the 21st Century Classroom will be flexible and highly connective. Moveable, comfortable furniture will be important to encourage small group collaboration and communication. The ability to move furniture will also be important to incorporate new technologies as they develop because we don’t know when, where, and how much space this hardware will require. Connectivity through a media that allows as many types of learning as possible will be important as learning institutions seek to distinguish themselves. Learning institutions that thrive in the 21st Century will have classrooms that embrace the social, physical, and emotional aspects of learning.

My six-year-old is now seven, one year closer to higher education. She’s used to having simple questions answered by her computer, and
she’ll be expecting an engaging learning environment.

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Dr. Shawn Apostel is the Instructional Technology Specialist at Bellarmine University where he provides support to faculty and IT to facilitate online and classroom instruction that incorporates technology. Prior to his appointment, he served as the Communication Coordinator for the Noel Studio for Academic Creativity at Eastern Kentucky University and as the Information and Graphics Specialist for the City of Toccoa. He has a B.A. in Journalism, an M.A in Professional Communication from Clemson University, and a Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Technical Communication from Michigan Technological University.

His research interests include teaching with technology, applied creativity, digital ethos, e-waste reduction, and visual communication. He serves as a reviewer for various journals and conferences. His work is published by IGI Global, CCDigital Press, Lexington Books, New Forums Press, and Computers and Composition Online. He co-edited Online Credibility and Digital Ethos: Evaluating Computer-Mediated Communication which was published by IGI Global in December 2012, and co-authored book Teaching Creative Thinking: A New Pedagogy for the 21st Century which was published by New Forums Press in Spring 2013.

 

 

In My Opinion: Telehealth Solutions Enhance Patient Care Engagement

Telehealth adoption is increasing rapidly. Health systems across the country are looking to this technology to help reduce costs, improve quality and access to care across the Emergency Department, ICU and even to the home. Although hospital leaders typically focus on the details of a significant capital appropriation, they often overlook the need for relationship building among their care teams to help sustain the success of the program.

So, we have technology, but do we have trust?

Thanks to interoperability advancements, virtualized teams suffer not from a drought of information access, but instead from the false assurance that having all the information can replace the need for frequent and meaningful bi-directional engagement with the care provider teams physically on site at the patient bedside1. This partnership creates a finely orchestrated collaboration, centered around delivering exceptional patient care and evidence-based software tools that seek to create an environment where: interventions are proactive versus reactive, audio-visual solutions that can bring people closer by producing real-time, low-latency interactions, and a bond between clinicians, whether at the bed-side or remote.

Patient care doesn’t stand still; care enabled through telehealth solutions that can support access and patient care engagement will change the way care is delivered.  Thanks to the Philips IntelliSpace eCareManager Platform powered by Vidyo technology, tomorrow’s telehealth solutions can be recognized today. The platform features significant tools for enabling coordination of patient care and monitors patients in the ICU and other areas of the hospital. Whether through mobility strategies focused on getting the right message to the right person, on time, or connecting families across geographies to provide comfort when it means the most, care delivery going forward is reliant on advancements in telehealth – and the collaborative teams and companies working together to provide them.

1. Darek M. Haftor, Anita Mirijamdotter, Gunilla Bradley, Information and Communication Technologies, Society and Human Beings: Theory and Framework, 2011, IGI Global, PA (Chapter 18; p 225-240)

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Karsten Russell-Wood is a healthcare marketing professional with over 12 years of global product development and strategy experience. He currently serves as the Senior Global Marketing Manager for the Philips Enterprise Telehealth Solutions business. Prior to joining Philips, Karsten held global product management roles within GE’s healthcare businesses with an orientation to targeted patient populations. He graduated from The Johns Hopkins University with a concentration in International Relations and Asian Studies. He graduated in 2010 from The Carey Business School, Johns Hopkins with an MBA and is presently pursuing on-going graduate work through the University of Massachusetts centered on public health.