Simply Amazing: Counting Vidyo Connections at CERN

What’s really BIG at CERN – the research organization that focuses on the smallest objects in the universe?

I’m not talking about CERN’s Large Hadron Collider that has been used to identify the Higgs boson. Nope, it’s the size of their VidyoConferencing deployment and its utilization.

Throughout 2012, the client downloads rose slowly from about 2000 to just under 14,000. Then, in January, the Vidyo service fully took the load and downloads exploded by more than 10,000 downloads to almost 24,000 in just five months.

But it’s not just the number of users that’s impressive, it’s how CERN leverages visual collaboration in their research. They are peaking 600 simultaneous connections at precise points in any given day. Some of these meetings may be small, connecting individuals to other individuals, or can be even larger, connecting groups with groups — in all, these meetings are averaging 2000 total connections a day. But it is the ability to hold large meetings that is really important to CERN’s collaborations. Since CERN started using Vidyo, they’ve had over 1400 meetings where the number of participants ranged between 25–50 connections. And this is all on a self-managed system with a worldwide deployment connecting people with mobile devices, laptops and room systems including legacy H.323 systems.

Two of CERN’s largest research experiments are ATLAS and CMS which are the largest international scientific collaborations in history, involving thousands of particle physicists, engineers, technicians, students and support staff from hundreds of universities and institutes. In April 2013 alone, ATLAS had 1860 Vidyo meetings and CMS had 1183 Vidyo meetings.

Steven Goldfarb, Outreach and Education Coordinator for ATLAS describes why Vidyo is so important to their mission:

Much of our research is done outside of CERN, maybe 10 percent of us are here at CERN. We have to remain connected all of the time. That’s the only way to be able to make decisions and contribute to those decisions as a collaboration.”

In the video conferencing world, numbers like the ones discussed here are amazing numbers. CERN’s self-managed deployment involves more than 20 VidyoRouters spanning the world and 11 VidyoGateways clustered in three locations across the network. Users may connect over wired or wireless connections, and they are able to have large
multi-user meetings. Don’t you agree that this is simply incredible?

Note: you can look at this data yourself on CERN’s public dashboard: http://avc-dashboard.web.cern.ch/Vidyo.

 

 

Maximize Workplace Collaboration with Visual Communications

Don’t know about you, but I often feel like I’m drowning in a sea of digitally communicated words!  Texts, emails, IMs and the like seem to have taken the place of actual conversations. Not only do our personal lives suffer from this, our workplace has transformed into a place where we constantly need to deal with the data driven craze–  as the inundation of electronically transmitted words — information, questions, issues all needing to be responded to ASAP – never seem to end.

But the workplace still appreciates and values face-to-face communications. Don’t you agree? Even more importantly, many organizations require face-to-face meetings with fellow colleagues occasionally, if not all the time. The benefits of face-to-face meetings stretch beyond making decisions on the fly, it also helps people adjust to emotional cues and allows for a better sense of team and relationship building for ultimately better business productivity.

Video conferencing in the workplace:
•  brings people together via face-to-face communications and nurtures a collaborative effort
•  ignites a collaborative culture where people and teams can feel comfortable visually sharing plans and exchanging ideas
•  fosters team and relationship building by encouraging individuals to visually share their vibrant personalities
•  resolves problems quicker and builds strong team chemistry

There are a myriad of reasons why slowly, but surely, face-to-face communications is making a huge comeback.  And no, we’re not talking about having to be physically present in order to have these great conversations.  More and more businesses are turning to high quality visual collaboration and communications via the Internet, 4G and other easily accessed networks, without having to spend a lot of money on equipment and infrastructure – and Vidyo is leading this revolution in terms of technological excellence and affordability.

A rapidly growing number of companies and organizations are already realizing the many benefits of Vidyo’s solution. Take KaBOOM! for example, a national nonprofit that envisions a great place to play within walking distance of every child—serving over 6.5 million children, engaging with over 1 million volunteers and have successfully built or improved over 15 thousand playgrounds in America. You can only imagine the massive scale of collaboration needed to communicate with everyone involved in each project. Vidyo has transformed the KaBOOM! conferencing dynamic. The result is reduced costs, more productive and efficient project meetings, and a quicker and more powerful human connection for the team. Or take Concern Worldwide, an international charity, fighting world poverty, that connects humanitarian aid workers in 24 countries.  Vidyo helps connect 2,200 Concern Worldwide personnel to be able to instantly, clearly and affordably communicate and collaborate visually with field managers in some of the most remote locations in the world.

Collaboration is imperative to success. Whether it’s building a playground for a community or connecting charitable people around the world – video communications in the workplace is making a world of difference.

But, don’t just take my word for it! If you register for Vidyo’s upcoming webinar, you will hear, firsthand, from Vidyo’s CEO, Ofer Shapiro, and our featured speakers, David S. Maldow, Esq. and Howard S. Lichtman, from Telepresence Options, “Why Video Collaboration Will Make Audio-Conferencing Extinct.” Whether you agree or disagree with this premise, we’re certain that this will be a spirited conversation between our presenters … one that you can’t afford to miss!

 

VidyoWorks™ – It’s All About the Platform

The last two weeks were very busy with product news and strategic win announcements for Vidyo:  Important partnerships with the likes of Mitel, Arkadin and CTN, a gigantic win with CERN, and of course exciting news about VidyoConferencing 3.0, featuring major usability enhancements and innovations throughout the Vidyo portfolio including a new Microsoft Lync Integration.  Now, today, we have jointly announced with Ricoh, the U.S. availability of a sleek, portable, light-weight Vidyo-based videoconferencing system that’s the size of a notebook!

So why are all of these announcements significant and what do they have to do with each other? It’s all about a platform that scales! The affordability and innovation enabled by the VidyoWorks APIs has sparked the interest and imagination of a wide range of companies and organizations looking for a solution that satisfies all of their visual collaboration modalities – not just some of them – and does it at a cost that is comparable to voice services.  As the growing number of important Vidyo partners indicates, Vidyo has demonstrated its strength and leadership, not only in terms of technological innovation, but also in its ability to forge new roads in the marketplace that allow our customers and partners access to a level of scalability and geographical distribution that has never before been achieved affordably and with such high quality. By doing so, Vidyo has upped the ante for every video conferencing vendor in the world. Now every significant player is trying to develop a scalable video coding (SVC) strategy. SVC is much more than a compression standard, it allows for a new architecture, which Vidyo has perfected for years from both product and intellectual property perspectives. We welcome these new offerings into the SVC-enabled world as we continue to lead with our field-proven products.

Everywhere you look, it seems, there are new and exciting examples of Vidyo products and services.  Since last week, alone, we have made several impressive announcements: a Vidyo/Arkadin-powered web-based service deployed by the California Telehealth Network that will improve healthcare to patients in rural California, a partnership with Mitel that will result in the integration of Vidyo’s HD video and telepresence solutions across their entire line of unified communications and collaborations (UCC) products, and yet another example of a global cloud-based video conferencing solution, with the unveiling of the P3000 from Ricoh, an important Vidyo partner in the US.

After a very long wait, the visual communication revolution is finally here and we are so proud to be at the heart of it. We would like to thank all of our great customers, partners, investors and, of course, our dedicated and talented employees who have made all of this possible.

***

Disclaimer: Many of the products and features described herein remain in varying stages of development and will be offered on a when-and-if available basis. The product plans, specifications, and descriptions are provided for information only and are subject to change without notice, and are provided without warranty of any kind, express or implied.  Vidyo reserves the right to modify future product plans at any time.

Ofer Shapiro, Vidyo co-founder and CEO, has been an innovative force at the heart of major architectural transformations in the videoconferencing industry since 1996. He was integrally involved in the development of the H.323 specification and the first IP based multi-point control unit architecture and gatekeepers, developed the use of H.264 Scalable Video Coding (SVC) for video conferencing, and led the development of a new media relay based architecture- the VidyoRouter. Ofer is a named inventor on 40 issued and 28 pending patent families. He was named a World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer, and received the Wall Street Journal Innovation Award for Disruption in the category of Internet, Networking and Broadband. 

 

 

 

Vidyo Continues to Push the State-of-the-Art Forward

Come see the future of Vidyo at InfoComm Booth #1581

Today is an exciting day for Vidyo. If you haven’t already, please read our latest announcement on the release of VidyoConferencingTM 3.0 – an upgrade that will move the industry forward by delivering a new integrated desktop, enhancing the user experience to deliver mass adoption of visual communications. It also introduces two new room systems at market-disrupting prices and additional features like an iPad app to share, view, and annotate content.

VidyoConferencing 3.0 – More Functionality, Accessibility, Affordability, and Control wherever you may be.

If there is a theme for this year’s Vidyo showcase at InfoComm 2013, it would simply be “more”. Perhaps that alone is a good place to anchor this discussion. We are now entering our third generation of product maturity.  VidyoConferencing 1.0 brought personal telepresence to a largely room system-based market. We delivered multipoint meetings over any IP? network with so little latency that you could have a natural meeting experience at a very affordable price. With VidyoConferencing 2.0, Vidyo brought about real infrastructure scalability by delivering latency-free
cascading among VidyoRoutersTM that localized traffic for network efficiency. This was followed by virtualizing the entire infrastructure!

And now, with Vidyoconferencing 3.0, Vidyo is leading the videoconferencing market once again, with an advanced end user experience on a
future-proof architecture.

So what’s new?

VidyoWeb: More Accessibility
What? No need for guests to download the software client application to join in a video conference? That’s right. Vidyo is making it more accessible than ever to join a Vidyo conference.  Vidyo moves into the browser with VidyoWeb, TM a simple plug-in so guests can join a Vidyo conference without installing the VidyoDesktopTM client!

And that’s not all! Unified Communications (UC) is a hot topic with enterprise IT, and Microsoft Lync® is one of the leading platforms. Vidyo’s
new plug-in for Lync
gives the full Vidyo experience to Lync users by allowing Vidyo to reside completely within the Lync window. It delivers not only the natural multipoint experience, but enables integration with legacy architecture room systems. And the Outlook® plug-in enables integrated scheduling.

More Functionality
The modernized user interface (UI) exposes new features including integrated chat plus more functional pre-call and in-call capabilities.

VidyoMobile 2.0: More Control
The new VidyoMobileTM app lets you invite anyone from your contact list to a meeting, putting even more power into the palm of your hand so you can schedule or immediately invite anyone to a meeting from wherever you are.

Room Systems Starting at $999: More Affordable
Vidyo continues to disrupt the room system market with even lower prices. Immersive telepresence is now available for under $5000/screen with the VidyoPanorama 600 which supports up to 6x 1080p60.  If your company is considering various telepresence options for purchase and deployment, it’s clear to see that Vidyo’s is the more economical and smarter choice. And with the new Intel NUC (network unit computing)-based VidyoRooms, Vidyo marks the dawn of a new era of software-based room systems and sets the stage for room system prices to
fall at the rate of the PC world.

So, if you’re at InfoComm and want to see the future, be sure to stop by Vidyo’s Booth #1581. We’ll also have a live demo of H.265 running side-by-side with H.264 so you can compare the quality and marvel at the reduction in bandwidth consumption this new technology can bring!  See you there.

The new Google+ Hangouts

In recent days after the announcement of a new Google+ Hangouts platform, we’ve received many inquiries about just how Vidyo fits into the new solution. First, let me just say how excited we are about Google’s new communication platform. This cross device messaging approach, that connects Android, Chrome, Gmail and iOS alike, is a huge step in making the user experience as simple as can be, and that means wider adoption. It’s also further testament to the success the product has had and how visual communication is becoming an increasingly important part of the way people interact.

Some diligent bloggers have taken a look at the legal notices of the new Hangouts product and noticed that Vidyo’s patent notice is not there, which triggered a lot of rumors about Vidyo being ‘out’ of the Google+ Hangouts platform. Some people speculated that Google had replaced our technology for WebRTC. The truth is this was just an editorial oversight and the media technology in Google+ Hangouts did not change. Our partnership remains as strong as ever, and frankly, we couldn’t be happier. Hangouts is turning into a mainstream and useful form of communication which is in line with the trends we see across our business, from consumers to business applications.

 

# # #

Ofer Shapiro, Vidyo co-founder and CEO, has been an innovative force at the heart of major architectural transformations in the videoconferencing industry since 1996. He was integrally involved in the development of the H.323 specification and the first IP based multi-point control unit architecture and gatekeepers, developed the use of H.264 Scalable Video Coding (SVC) for video conferencing, and led the development of a new media relay based architecture- the VidyoRouter. Ofer is a named inventor on 40 issued and 28 pending patent families. He was named a World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer, and received the Wall Street Journal Innovation Award for Disruption in the category of Internet, Networking and Broadband. 

 

 

Telehealth Talk with Vidyo VP Amnon Gavish

How have you seen telehealth evolve over the years?

Amnon Gavish, Vidyo’s SVP of Vertical Solutions

Telemedicine and telehealth has been evolving for over 15 years. It is agreed among those who have been following this evolution that economic factors, aging population, the effects of public policies and a growing trend for more resources in care, has generated a strong demand for reform and efficiency in healthcare processes and practices. This trend represents a golden opportunity for integration of telehealth into healthcare workflows. Dr. Dale Alverson, the former President of the American Telehealth Association (ATA) has described it as “A perfect storm.” New technologies are developed and modalities continue to evolve. We’re seeing hospitals connect with other hospitals to provide healthcare services; local health facilities, clinics and nursing homes are no longer confined to the resources available only within their own campuses. The rise of technologies that allow people to easily connect, contributes to the increase of enabling technological developments that, accordingly, promote, validate and inspire the use of telehealth.

Why is Vidyo seeing so much success in the healthcare market?

Vidyo’s unique architecture opens the door to new healthcare applications and services that simply are not possible with traditional videoconferencing solutions. Unlike Vidyo, legacy solutions can’t scale to reach millions across a wide variety of global locations; to connect patients with practitioners anywhere, anytime, and in any place via commodity devices over public networks. Vidyo’s technology eliminates the complex and costly process of installing expensive networks and equipment, making it easy for patients to connect, while offering the high level of telepresence-quality video and audio communications needed to facilitate excellent healthcare delivery.

Why couldn’t this be achieved with traditional or off-the-shelf videoconferencing solutions?

There are fundamental requirements for healthcare-related videoconferencing that address security and patient privacy issues. Healthcare communications and collaboration systems need to have the capability to control who joins the conversation while managing and protecting participant identity. Simply said — this just isn’t possible with any of the consumer solutions on the market. Another key factor to consider is a level of communication quality high enough to help build trust between the patient and doctor. Vidyo’s patented VidyoRouter™ architecture offers unprecedented error resiliency, low latency rate matching thus enabling natural, affordable, high-quality video to work over the Internet, LTE and 4G networks enabling natural interaction between patients and doctors to make them feel as if the other person was in the same room.

What are some of the new healthcare applications and services enabled by Vidyo?

Vidyo’s technology is transforming traditional healthcare processes. From changing hospital workflow in the ICU or extending patient care to the home, Vidyo’s technology enables real-time, high quality videoconferencing that can be applied for use cases like telepsychiatry—used for preventive consultations to help people quit smoking or fight against obesity, for instance. Vidyo’s technology is also leveraged in places like rural Alaska, where remote care is fundamentally needed, but finding the best care means traveling a great number of miles. Vidyo makes it possible for doctors to perform reliable, remote primary care examinations, like ear and dermatology checkups or even oversee a physical exam without having to be physically present.

Vidyo’s technology is also being implemented to streamline hospital services such as improving the patient discharge processes, reducing readmissions and refining overall accountable care. In other cases, hospitals have adopted Vidyo as a part of their call centers where a trial nurse accepts the first call to consult with patients.

What are your thoughts on the future of telehealth and where do you see Vidyo’s role in that?

It’s said by folks in the field that introducing the term “telehealth” actually induced a fear amongst those in the industry and was responsible for slowing down the adoption of “telehealth” solutions. The way I see it, in the not-too-distant future, the separate category of “telehealth” probably won’t exist. Instead, we will likely see that, what is now a distinct adjunct to healthcare will soon become an integral part of standard healthcare provision for all. Overtime, as caregivers and administrators adopt and integrate new systems and technology like Vidyo, and provide more training to staff members on the latest technologies, “telehealth” will play a core role in everyday evaluations, diagnoses and decisions by healthcare providers.


About Amnon Gavish

Amnon Gavish brings more than 15 years of experience in the telecommunications market. Before joining Vidyo in October 2009, Amnon was the Chief Technology Officer at Keisense Inc., an innovator in the field of textual user interface for Computer Electronics devices. Previously, he served as VP of Business Development at RADVISION, where he was responsible for the company’s strategic partnerships and for the definition of the company’s product offering to the service providers market. Amnon was the CEO and co-Founder of Surf Communications, where he was responsible for all activities, from product inception, through go-to-market strategy, strategic partnerships and sales.

Vidyo Makes Scientific Collaboration VISUALLY Compelling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

If you haven’t been blown away sufficiently by some of the most recent Vidyo-related news you’ve read … here’s the latest on Vidyo’s never-ending list of WOW items! The preliminary phase of a nationwide communications system for scientific collaboration across academic, industrial and government partners has been recently completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the largest science and energy national laboratory in the U.S. Department of Energy system. ORNL’s scientific programs focus on materials, neutron science, energy, high-performance computing, systems biology and national security.

So what does Vidyo have to do with this system that is now providing the core communications solution to connect such renowned institutions as ORNL, Los Alamos National Lab, Sandia National Lab, Idaho National Lab, MIT, NC State University, Westinghouse, University of Michigan, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)?

EVERYTHING!

Vidyo, in conjunction with Digital Video Enterprise (DVE) telepresence, helped develop the Virtual Office Community and Computing (VOCC) Laboratory that provides, real-time video and information exchange among a national science team engaged in the modeling and simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). The custom-designed Vidyo-DVE network is a unique telepresence and agile video collaboration environment that includes a massive, multipoint energy sciences exchange is able to link all types of endpoints, from tablets and smart devices to immersive telepresence rooms and visualization venues.

For the next phase of development, the VOCC Laboratory plans to continue the partnership with Vidyo to develop a scalable, affordable, secure, and interoperable telepresence that will support collaborative communication between the Department of Energy (DOE) Critical Materials Energy Innovation Hub and their biggest materials customer, the Department of Defense (DOD). The VOCC lab is piloting an effort to establish a multi-user collaboration community using a beta version DOD portal provided by Vidyo. The planned conferencing suite meets DOD Joint Interoperability Test Command’s (JITC) requirements, including related Defense Switch Network (DSN) and IPV6 interoperability requirements. Vidyo is the first software-based, telepresence-quality video conferencing solution to be JITC certified and is fully compatibility with H.323/SIP standards based end points and infrastructure.

For more details about this exciting announcement from ORNL, click here.

In My Opinion: Vidyo Goes Viral at Arizona State University

Big news for Vidyo, Inc. today in the academic world! Vidyo has partnered with Internet2, a member-owned advanced technology community founded by the nation’s leading higher education institutions, to create and provide a low-cost, subscription-based video communications service for all Internet2 university members and thousands of public K-12 schools in the United States. After a thorough trial run of the Vidyo-based solution at Arizona State, Emory and Northwestern Universities, the Vidyo NET+ Service is expected to be available for early adopter enrollments this May. Arizona State University was extremely influential making this happen; in fact, they sponsored Vidyo as a NET+ Service, based on the great experience they’ve had using Vidyo at ASU for the past several years. Accordingly, we could think of no one more appropriate to share their first-hand experience with Vidyo. The following is an account from Guy Mullins, ASU’s Director of New Media, Academic Technologies:

When we first introduced the use of Vidyo at ASU, it was for one particular purpose: a class at the School of Life Sciences in which our students in Tempe, Arizona communicated and collaborated with leading research scientists and experts from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s facilities on Barro Colorado Island, in the middle of the Panama Canal.  We needed a video communications solution that would allow students and faculty at ASU to connect easily and interact seamlessly with the Smithsonian experts in these remote tropical areas.  It was no small feat … but Vidyo well surpassed any of our expectations and news of this exceptional communications tool spread rapidly. Mainly through ‘word of mouth,’ we soon had others in our academic community requesting Vidyo and downloading the application.

To date, we’ve seen well over two thousand downloads of the Vidyo client application across our community. In terms of demand, we are about double the number of monthly client downloads over this same time last year.

With this in mind, we have started to look a bit more closely at who among our community are using Vidyo.

Based on our early analysis of our usage data mapped against our general user directories, it appears that Vidyo is still primarily a tool of the technical minded staff at ASU.  I anticipate that the next wave of adoption will come from faculty and researchers. Opening up this technology to a much broader range of users through simple-to-use and inexpensive Vidyo desktop tools, we’re finding many more rich, interesting, and innovative uses for video communications across our entire university and beyond.

We’re seeing scientists from a wide range of disciplines collaborate on research with their colleagues from around the world; we have expert guest lecturers being introduced remotely into our classrooms; field reports being filed by our broadcast journalism students; collaborations in the arts, theater, and more.  It is inspiring to see how a new technology can really have an impact in improving our teaching, learning, and research capabilities. Given the strong growth patterns of Vidyo usage , we believe we are only at the beginning of what is yet to come in terms of videoconferencing in the academic community. This global thinking has ironically also spawned some new ideas at home that we hope to explore soon; we’ve realized that our campus is large enough and diverse enough that we actually have numerous “field trip” opportunities we can engage in across campus – or even just down the hall – in which Vidyo can be utilized to bring hundreds of students into lab spaces, studios, research environments, and more.  We look forward to some of these “inside the box” approaches to deploying Vidyo to enhance our teaching and learning activities.

We are now averaging more than eleven hundred calls per month (1114 calls per month as of March 2013 – see above chart) either person-to-person or in collaborative group meetings.  That is far more than we were seeing just a short time ago, and arguably a ten–fold increase over any previous videoconferencing technology we’ve deployed in the past.  Again though, looking at our current rate of growth for Vidyo usage and adoption, I’m confident that in another year the numbers we’re seeing today will be relatively quaint by comparison.  The future of videoconferencing with Vidyo looks bright at ASU.

# # #

Guy Mullins, Director of New Media at ASU’s University Technology Office, has over 25 years of experience in higher education media production. A focus on documentary and research production combined with networking and social media collaboration, Guy’s work blends both traditional and emerging approaches to educational media applications. Guy has a B.A. from the University of Arizona, where his studies focused on Radio & Television; minor studies include Fine Arts and Business, and a M.Ed., Arizona State University, with an emphasis in Educational Media & Computers.


 

 

 

 

In My Opinion: What the 21st Century Classroom Looks Like

Not too long ago, my six-year-old daughter wanted to make a kite, so we opened up her laptop and searched “how to make a kite” on YouTube. We had several videos to choose from on the first page of results, and my daughter soon found one that suited her purpose. Within minutes she was collecting material and pressing pause during each step in the video as she followed directions. She could rewind or play the video as she progressed, and an hour later we were testing her kite outside.

Welcome to learning in the 21st Century. Today, students learn from peers, an online community, and experts who share their knowledge through traditional and online publishing resources. University students I work with have access to more information through their cellphones than I did in my entire library as an undergrad.

Smart phones are a wakeup call to educators. The days of constructing four walls with a podium at the front and calling it a school house are over. Today’s students are highly connected and consume information when and where it’s needed. New pushes in augmented reality, combined with the possibilities of hardware like Google Glass, will change the face of education as we know it.

Unfortunately, many educators tend to focus on testing memorization skills—think every multiple choice question you ever endured–but, as Socrates lamented when writing became popular, memorization is no longer important; and the testing of memorization skills is a significant distraction in education. This reliance on a historically structured curriculum leads to one right answer, as Sir Ken Robinson says, “at the back of the book,” rather than opening up the curriculum to multiple questions, ideally generated by the students themselves.

What society needs are people who can ask good questions, come up with creative solutions, critically examine those possibilities to figure out which one creative solution is most likely to be effective, and communicate that solution effectively enough to motivate others to action. Classrooms in the 21st century will take this into account. One step in this direction is the flipped classroom, in which students watch lectures and read course material outside of class, and use class time to engage with topics and course material through small group discussion or individual projects.

The 21st Century Classroom will be a place where students move up on Bloom’s taxonomy (the new version) beyond rote memorization skills to creation skills. These classrooms will be intellectually safe, comfortable places that encourage peer interaction and tactile connections with the material students are studying (virtual or physical) because these experiences inspire creative solutions and communication skills. Successful classrooms will facilitate networking, small group collaboration, and interaction with the subject of study.

These rooms will also be highly connected. Right now campuses have WiFi available but not in all classrooms and learning spaces. New technologies will allow students and instructors to stay connected constantly. Successful educators will be the ones who can connect learning material with the visual, tactile, and social aspects of the subject: e.g., connecting students with professionals who are successful in their respective fields.

Thanks to initiatives like TedTalks and Creative Commons, students have an unprecedented opportunity to listen to lectures from individuals who are the brightest minds in their field. Students also have the ability to securely attend classes through video they may have missed due to illness, or meet with scholars and practitioners virtually as a class through software like Vidyo. Location is no longer a barrier for those who are connected. If the traditional schoolhouse is a wooden building in a field, the 21st Century Classroom is Willie Wonka’s glass elevator, able to move sideways and slantways and even travel outside the factory. The instructor’s role has moved from content deliverer to experience facilitator.

In short, the 21st Century Classroom will be flexible and highly connective. Moveable, comfortable furniture will be important to encourage small group collaboration and communication. The ability to move furniture will also be important to incorporate new technologies as they develop because we don’t know when, where, and how much space this hardware will require. Connectivity through a media that allows as many types of learning as possible will be important as learning institutions seek to distinguish themselves. Learning institutions that thrive in the 21st Century will have classrooms that embrace the social, physical, and emotional aspects of learning.

My six-year-old is now seven, one year closer to higher education. She’s used to having simple questions answered by her computer, and
she’ll be expecting an engaging learning environment.

# # #

Dr. Shawn Apostel is the Instructional Technology Specialist at Bellarmine University where he provides support to faculty and IT to facilitate online and classroom instruction that incorporates technology. Prior to his appointment, he served as the Communication Coordinator for the Noel Studio for Academic Creativity at Eastern Kentucky University and as the Information and Graphics Specialist for the City of Toccoa. He has a B.A. in Journalism, an M.A in Professional Communication from Clemson University, and a Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Technical Communication from Michigan Technological University.

His research interests include teaching with technology, applied creativity, digital ethos, e-waste reduction, and visual communication. He serves as a reviewer for various journals and conferences. His work is published by IGI Global, CCDigital Press, Lexington Books, New Forums Press, and Computers and Composition Online. He co-edited Online Credibility and Digital Ethos: Evaluating Computer-Mediated Communication which was published by IGI Global in December 2012, and co-authored book Teaching Creative Thinking: A New Pedagogy for the 21st Century which was published by New Forums Press in Spring 2013.

 

 

A View from the Other Side of the Chasm

In his 1991 classic bestseller, Crossing the Chasm, and  the 1995 follow-up book , Inside the Tornado, author Geoffrey Moore offers the concept of a five-stage technology adoption life cycle, with special emphasis on a “deep and dividing chasm” that separates the early adoption of any new technology or technological paradigm from ultimate acceptance by the mass market.  Moore theorizes that this wide gap, if not bridged carefully from a marketing standpoint, often threatens the success of new-entrant companies; even those with the most innovative and disruptive technologies.  He suggests that if and when a product “crosses the chasm” it then experiences the Tornado, “a period of mass-market adoption, when the general marketplace switches over to the new infrastructure paradigm” which hopefully propels the product into a period of mass-market adoption.


Well, I’m pleased to report that, after years of steadfast effort to build and secure that all important bridge, Vidyo is now solidly positioned on the other side of that chasm and experiencing rapid growth within the tornado … and though it’s a bit breezy at times, the energy in here is great!

Yesterday Vidyo announced that it completed another record year in 2012 — delivering 68% billings growth, with our top 25 reseller partners growing over 435% on aggregate since Q1 2011 through Q4 2012.  All evidence points to Vidyo’s holistic business growth, market traction and our leading role in transforming the video conferencing industry.

The new paradigm Vidyo introduced into the video conferencing industry, has truly changed the game and transformed the industry to where incumbent players have not only acknowledged Vidyo’s approach, they have announced support for Scalable Video Coding (SVC), the standard chosen by Vidyo to enable the unique VidyoRouter architecture.  SVC has gone from something that only the earliest adopters had heard of five years ago, to a key purchasing criterion for those looking to invest in a video conferencing solution.  Vidyo’s new paradigm has brought costs and quality in line with customer expectations and, as a result, opened new markets and usage scenarios that are thriving from the benefit of Vidyo’s architectural advantages that enable our customers to scale their deployments to support 1000x more devices (off-the-shelf hardware like desktops, laptops and mobile) than room systems!

According to Moore’s innovation adoption life cycle, the other side of the chasm is comprised of what he calls the “pragmatists” of the market – those who need to see well-established proof before investing in a product or service. Pragmatists want to know that others are using the product successfully and their risks are minimal.  As more and more pragmatists are convinced, market demand increases exponentially, and that’s when a new product or paradigm is “inside the tornado”– being swept up to the top of the technology adoption curve.

Vidyo is well on its way to the top of the mass market curve – we have provided ample evidence that our paradigm is the smart choice!  In 2012 we have continued to win many new customers, establish key partnerships, solidify existing ones, and open a variety of new markets. Most importantly, in terms of Moore’s theory, we have secured the necessary “lighthouse” customers and partners whose beacons shine with the successes they are having and illuminate the many technological and economic advantages Vidyo has brought to their organizations.  Vidyo has seen tremendous success with the pragmatists (while opening other new usage scenarios in markets comprised of enthusiasts and innovators), a segment of the market that has fueled our growth.

So…what does it look like from the other side of the chasm?  From the early majority side, the view is expansive and promising … there are hills to climb, no doubt … but as any mountaineer knows, with the proper skills, tools and experience, the sky is the limit. Vidyo has the insight, a substantial technology advantage and, the proven experience to continue to transform the video communications industry, forging new ground in terms of quality, scalability and affordability.   Check out Vidyo’s news and see the view for yourself.

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Ashish is Vidyo’s CMO and Senior Vice President, Corporate Development. Ashish joins Vidyo having successfully led product marketing, product management, channels and business development teams in unified communication, collaboration, mobile and telecom companies with a focus on growing and scaling the business. Previously, Ashish led the Business Development and Strategy team for Microsoft Office Division’s Unified Communications Group. He also led Microsoft’s Channel Sales and Marketing team for Real Time Communications, led and managed key Microsoft Office and Unified Communications and Collaboration strategic alliances and co-led key strategic initiatives. Prior to Microsoft, Ashish was VP of Product and Solutions at Alcatel/Genesys Telecommunications, VP of Marketing and Business Development at Telera Inc., management consultant for Braxton/Deloitte Consulting, and held marketing leadership positions at HP and Covad. Ashish has an MBA from UCLA and a Bachelors in Economics and Computer Science from Grinnell College.