Security: Not All Video Conferencing Platforms Are Created Equal

Last night, Nicole Perlroth wrote an interesting piece about corporate security and video camera hacking issues. The article resonated throughout the web and rightfully so: security is – and should be – a major concern when it comes to corporate networks. Luckily, not all video conferencing platforms are created equal, the VidyoRouter provides a level of security superior to other video conferencing solutions.

The article highlights two key issues:

  1. People are deploying endpoints on public IPs. Why? Because it is too difficult, too expensive or both to place them on their intranet and solve the firewall traversal issue AND they need to be able to connect with people outside of their corporate network.
  2. As directly accessible devices, legacy room systems are inherently prone to hacking when visible in public space, particularly when they ship by default with the auto answer feature turned on (as is the case with Polycom). The way these devices are accessed is dialing of an IP string from another legacy endpoint. There is no layer of protection between the two.

Here’s how Vidyo addresses these issues:

  1. VidyoRouter Cloud Edition enables customers to solve firewall traversal as a deployment option without buying expensive dedicated equipment or paying for special licensing. By deploying a low cost VidyoRouter appliance inside the corporate network and another in the DMZ, firewall traversal is achieved natively and transparently from the user’s perspective by establishing explicit IP to IP rules on the firewall between the two trusted and secured devices. Using this approach, it becomes easy to keep all of the room system endpoints on the corporate network, behind the firewall, without sacrificing performance or accessibility to the rest of the world, and without adding cost to deployment.
  2. All of the Vidyo endpoints connect through the VidyoRouter and are not directly accessible from another endpoint. The VidyoRouter inherently provides the endpoint with a layer of security from third party hacking and voyeurism with technology built in for spoof prevention (other devices can’t pretend to be a trusted part of the Vidyo network), encrypted token technology for session security, HTTPS with certificate support on login, and TLS with certification for signaling as examples. It is not possible for a would-be hacker to connect directly to a Vidyo endpoint that is on the public network simply by dialing an IP address as is the case with legacy video conferencing endpoints.

Bottom line: Vidyo’s architecture not only delivers higher performance in terms of user experience over converged IP networks, but it also prevents the kind of malicious voyeurism legacy endpoints are susceptible to when left in public space with the auto-answer feature enabled.

 

Vidyo Helps Haiti Medical Education Project Rebuild Haiti’s Healthcare System, Donates VidyoConferencing Solution to Help Train Local Doctors

How about an uplifting news story for a change?  Here’s a short but important CNN video clip that aired over this past weekend.  As we mark the second anniversary of the earthquake that demolished much of Haiti, many of international news reports have focused on the fact that there is still so much that needs to be done to help this ravaged country.  But here is one very positive account of countries, universities, medical practitioners and Vidyo (!) coming together to ensure that Haiti’s own medical community is restored and able to thrive into the future.

The Haiti Medical Education (HME) Project — a non-profit (501c3) organization, established by international healthcare providers, academics, and social activists — was founded in 2010, following the devastating earthquake that brought worldwide attention to Haiti and its people.  Working in alliance with Haitian medical leadership, faculty, and students to preserve and further the education of the many displaced Haitian medical students affected by the earthquake disaster, its mission is to restore and build upon both the physical and curricular infrastructure of existing Haitian medical schools and teaching hospitals, to ensure that the next generation of Haitian doctors and medical leaders are ready to care for Haiti.

When HME coordinators identified “distance learning” via video conferencing as the best and fastest means to reactivate medical classes in Haiti, they were initially dismayed at the problems they encountered with most video conferencing systems they tried.

Dr. Galit M. Sacajiu, President and Medical Education Director of HME, explains: “Haiti’s problematic Internet connections and typically antiquated computer hardware presented major challenges when we first attempted to initiate remote classes via video communications. Vidyo was the only solution that was able to make these critical video connections at all possible. Vidyo’s capacity to support video conferencing under less-than-optimal bandwidth conditions was key to getting us up and running.”

VidyoConferencing used in Haiti by Medical Students

Since Vidyo’s products do not rely on specialized networks or equipment and can deliver quality video with even limited broadband connections, Vidyo was able to jump in and provide timely help in for this critical situation completely free of charge.

To date, 60 international medical professors from a variety of medical institutions — including Dartmouth College, Harvard Medical School, Albert Einstein Medical School in the U.S., McGill University and Montreal University Medical Schools in Canada, and Lyons University Medical School in France – have volunteered their time and expertise to enable Haitian physicians/medical students to continue their medical studies through a Vidyo-supported lecture program.   Currently there are 45+ Haitian medical students enrolled in the program and the number is expected to grow as the program expands.

According to HME lecturer and the Chairman of  HMEP advisory board advisor Dr. Brain Remillard, Associate Professor of Medicine and Section Chief, Nephrology & Hypertension, Dartmouth Medical School, “The task of physically rebuilding Haiti’s entire hospital and medical school infrastructure is incredibly complex; if we had to wait for the actual facilities to be constructed, we would lose a whole generation of physicians. Vidyo has helped us offer ‘knowledge without borders.’  What we can do with this assistance from Vidyo is revolutionary; we’re able to use cutting-edge technology to open up the world and the free flow of knowledge to make sure the best and the brightest young physicians in Haiti STAY in Haiti where they are desperately needed.”

At the core of HME’s Vidyo-supported initiative is a weekly lecture series taught by prominent medical educators from Canada, the United States and France who are able to instruct the Haitian students via high-quality VidyoConferencing that is accessed over the Internet, despite low-bandwidth limitations. The remote medical faculty members are able to clearly see and respond to the Haitian students, plus share documents via Vidyo; the students are likewise able to interact with the instructors.

Through this series, not only do Haitian medical students now have the opportunity to receive the needed credits to complete their medical degree, but the country’s practicing physicians are able to keep apprised of the latest medical information and techniques.  The HME project is currently working with at least ten clinical facilities in Haiti.

Haiti's first White Coat ceremony took place last weekend

A proof point of HME’s success was highlighted over this past weekend.  The first-ever Haitian “white coat ceremony”, an event during which medical students are formally welcomed into the doctoring profession, took place at  Quisqueya Medical School (QMS) in Pétion-Ville, Haïti.  During the ceremony, the graduating class took the Hippocratic Oath, which stresses the primacy of the doctor-patient relationship and the importance of compassion in medicine. This ceremony traditionally symbolizes the long journey towards professionalism and healing that all doctors must complete. To these particular Haitian medical students, the event provided an even greater measure of significance and pride.  Vidyo is gratified and honored to play a role in this milestone.

Four Surefire Signs Your Video Conferencing System May be a Clunker

The first sign of real trouble was when my car began stalling at red lights. On the happy occasion it did manage to remain idling, I’d gently press the accelerator only to lurch awkwardly into the intersection. The car would then shimmy violently until reaching its maximum cruising speed of 37 miles per hour. Before braking, I’d learned to crank up the radio to mask the unsettling sound of metal grinding against metal.

It’s never easy to watch a prized “hot rod” deteriorate into a rattletrap. Likewise, it can be hard to admit that a once state-of-the-art video conferencing system is now a clunker.

At Vidyo, we applaud the many forward-thinking companies who have taken the leap and invested in video conferencing. Visual collaboration is unmatched as a communication tool in its ability to convey meaning and enable natural, fluid conversation. When done right, it can deepen working relationships and make meetings dramatically more productive.

Unfortunately, video conferencing has historically required companies to purchase loads of costly, ill-designed hardware which – like my 1987 Ford Taurus – promised only a bumpy ride to certain obsolescence.

If you can relate to any of the following, it’s safe to say the wheels may be coming off your video conferencing system:

  1. Retreat to teleconferencing – Does your video conferencing equipment collect dust while your users huddle around old-fashioned speakerphones? Many systems are underused due to frustrations caused by lack of quality and ease of use.
  2. Room-centric video conferencing – Are your video conferencing sessions limited to meeting rooms?  Users need the flexibility to seamlessly bring people on desktops, smartphones, tablets and room systems into the same multipoint meeting.
  3. Standard definition resolution – Has no one joked that you repurpose your video conferencing screens for a Super Bowl party? Users now expect the same HD quality in the workplace that they’ve grown accustomed to in their living rooms. Standard definition can’t deliver a life-like, face-to-face meeting experience.
  4. Unnatural, delayed conversation – Do your meetings suffer from poor image quality and unnatural delays in the video stream? Your legacy system likely depends on antiquated multipoint control units (MCUs) and transcoding gateways that create latency and poor audio/video synchronization. Video conferencing is most successful when it replicates the fast moving give and take of in-person conversation.

Rather than simply toss out your outdated hardware, Vidyo has created a program to help organizations trade up – in a way that makes financial sense – to a better system. For a limited time, organizations can receive a credit toward the purchase of a Vidyo solution when they trade in a legacy room system. The credit goes as high as $5000 for each room system that is replaced with Vidyo.

Click here to request information about trading up to Vidyo personal telepresence.

 

 

Open Letter to Wainhouse Research Senior Analyst Andrew W. Davis

Dear Andrew,

I read with great interest your coverage of Cisco’s future multipoint video architecture. I am not sure if it was intentional, but your title selection resonated well with us: we all know what happened to the Empire! We (in the rebellion camp) are happy to see the big players admitting one after the other that all these expensive MCUs they are selling are a really bad investment – thank you for pointing this out.

This confirms what we have been saying all along: it is all about an efficient architecture that can replace the MCU. I did, however want to share my thoughts on some of the technical aspects around the Cisco solution.

The big question is HOW to replace the MCU, without losing functionality? Let me touch on a few aspects of this:

Error Resilience: As you mentioned in your analysis, Cisco provides error resilience using Forward Error Correction (FEC). FEC is a wasteful technique because you spend bits even when you don’t need them. Furthermore, it is particularly bad when error conditions are bursty. You identified this point much earlier in your November 2009 report “H.264 SVC: A Technical Assessment” (P. 25-30, “FEC overhead can range from 20% to 100%”). To make matters worse, the FEC overhead has to be added to the multi-stream overhead. Not to mention the fact that the FEC approach cannot avoid sending I frames, which degrades the quality of the call for all participants, not just the ones experiencing problems. FEC did not work with single-layer AVC and will not work well with multi-stream AVC either.

Personal Layouts and Bitrates: For years the key selling point of expensive MCUs was that you must be able to adapt the bitrate and viewing options to individually accommodate each participant. With the new Cisco solution everyone gets to see “Exactly the Same Thing” (like identical Storm Troopers). What happens with Cisco’s multi-stream solution if you happen to have 3/4 of the bandwidth required for full HD? Do you display the stamp-size 240p? And what if you want to see a 2×2 layout of 4 participants, you show them as 240p images on a 60-inch screen? What happens if some people want to see different people at HD? As you so rightfully point out in your commentary, “the difference is in the significant details.”

Error resilience matters, personal layout matters, and bitrate adaptation matters. And you can get all of them today, not in the future, with Vidyo’s implementation of video switching, using standard H.264 SVC. It’s called Adaptive Video Layering (AVL).

Interoperability: Arguably the most interesting feature of multi-streaming is the promise of better interoperability with legacy systems. From your note, however, it seems that the “native interoperability” claimed for Cisco’s architecture requires a Codian MCU to “act as the gateway between the multi-encoding world and the non-multi-encoding world for multi-point calls.” MOST Legacy devices participating in multipoint calls cannot do their own composition of the multi-stream, so they need someone to do it for them. The advantage, if any, will be limited to a small subset of Cisco’s newer endpoints.

In reality the market has already indicated where it is going, with a roster of Vidyo’s licensees that includes Google, Ricoh, and Hitachi, among many others, and Polycom and Microsoft announcing their plans to support SVC. Wainhouse Research has once again done a nice job in providing its readership with the information necessary to connect the dots with regard to where the video conferencing industry is heading. Everyone now agrees – there’s no future for the MCU.

- Ofer Shapiro.

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Vidyo Co-Founder and CEO Ofer Shapiro

Ofer co-founded Vidyo in 2005 and pioneered Personal Telepresence, enabling a new generation of software-based natural, multi-point HD video conferences on desktop computers, room systems, and mobile devices. Prior to Vidyo, Ofer spent eight years at RADVISION where he was responsible for the development of the first IP video conferencing bridge and gatekeeper technology and the first commercially successful video conferencing architecture. He also served as senior vice president of business development responsible for strategic sales and relationships. Ofer was a contributor and one of the editors of the H.323 standard. Ofer has over fifteen years of experience in bringing disruptive technologies to market. He holds a Master’s Degree in Applied Physics.

Video Conferencing Reaches an Inflection Point, and the Disruptor is Vidyo

Vidyo’s vision is to make natural communication universally available. Leading technologists doubted it could be accomplished. Competing vendors believed they could continue selling less for more.

Making natural communication universally available is about delivering standard definition per face, pictures that don’t break and latency below 250 ms for natural interaction. It also means affordable universal access to HD quality for anyone, over any network on any device. We undertook this goal 6 years ago through development of a very unique architecture which leverages the H.264 SVC compression standard. Vidyo has now been granted 10 patents (with 42 pending) for this architecture.

Today at Vidyo, we hear plenty of glowing reports from enterprises, government agencies, medical facilities and SMBs worldwide about the transformational power of Vidyo: how our affordable personal telepresence solutions help them communicate and collaborate better internally and with customers and constituents over desktops, mobile devices or telepresence room systems; how they are finding new ways to work smarter, capitalize on new business opportunities, become more competitive and to help communities recover from environmental disasters or improve the health and morale of those in need; how they are saving money by leveraging a software architecture on their existing smart phones, tablets, laptops, and desktops over the Internet, WiFi, 3G and 4G Networks.

It is gratifying when a leading Wall Street analyst firm – in this case Baird Equity Research – issues a report identifying Vidyo as the “disruptor” in a major inflection point in the global video conferencing market. Here’s the summary from the Baird report and its lead author, senior research analyst Jayson Noland (who you might have watched on CNBC’s Squawk Box program):

“We believe the video conferencing market is approaching an inflection point of more widespread commercial adoption driven by much lower-cost, high-quality enterprise solutions based in software. We believe this architectural shift will prove disruptive for hardware-based providers Cisco and Polycom, who currently enjoy dominant market share.”

Noland and other Baird analysts surveyed the video conferencing market, talking to vendors, resellers, and customers of video conferencing products around the world. They uncovered and present a number of interesting points about the market and its leading players, and they aren’t afraid to name names.

They make a strong case for the move toward the video compression technology standard that Vidyo’s products are based on. You can read the technical details for yourself, but here’s the main point from the report:

“…we believe H.264 SVC-based solutions (software-centric advanced compression technology) and the ‘consumerization’ of IT will allow for increased adoption rates and an expanded addressable market. While several years away, we expect software-intensive solutions to make video conferencing as pervasive as audio conferencing… Currently, Vidyo is the only vendor of size with H.264 SVC product that is generally available.”

Traditionally, video conferencing has been viewed as a big undertaking requiring dedicated rooms, equipment, and network resources. There are enormous costs involved in this traditional approach, as summed up in the Baird report:

“Industry sources estimate that [a] typical, traditional telepresence solution costs $1 million when considering the network and ongoing maintenance costs… Therefore, given the large up-front capex investment in video conferencing equipment and network upgrades, and the relatively intangible ROI, we [...] view traditional video conferencing solutions as hard to justify for many companies.”

In contrast:

“Vidyo has developed an architecture that allows the company to provide enterprise-grade mobility-focused video conferencing solutions at price points significantly below traditional vendors’ prices… With Vidyo’s recently launched VidyoPanorama, the company touts that it can provide a better telepresence experience for 10% of the cost of a traditional telepresence solution, which Vidyo estimates to be approximately $1 million (when considering the hardware, required networking, and ongoing maintenance costs)…”

“Vidyo prices its solutions significantly below Cisco and Polycom while providing the same or better quality video experience.” – Baird Equity Research Report

“While Vidyo seems to thrive in mobile environments, it also can excel in hybrid desktop/room projects, or even simply room environments. In fact, we understand that in a recent large competitive deal, Cisco and Polycom were forced to drop their prices by as much as 3x-4x to compete with Vidyo’s quote, but Vidyo still won based on a more optimal and scalable architecture… Vidyo prices its solutions significantly below Cisco and Polycom while providing the same or better quality video experience.“

Video conferencing makes intuitive sense to businesses, government agencies, and other organizations, but until recently the whole concept has been dragged down by the expense, inflexibility, and difficulty of setting up and conducting hardware-based video conferencing sessions. Vidyo is a “disruptor,” to use Baird’s term, because our software-based approach and underlying technology liberate people from the constraints of the old, outmoded approaches. A disruptive technology or disruptive innovation is “an innovation that helps create a new market and value network, and eventually goes on to disrupt an existing market and value network.” Initially Vidyo’s technology was considered to impact only the ‘new market’ – the desktop – but it is now clear that is impacts every aspect and form factor of video communication. The biggest impact which ties it all together is connecting mobile-desktop-room-telepresence across the same infrastructure without transcoding – which gives Vidyo the differentiated advantage of delivering natural video communications, universally and affordably.

The Baird report puts its finger on why Vidyo, and no current vendors dominating the market, represents the future of video conferencing:

“The consumerization of IT, combined with the rise of mobile and remote workers, has created an inflection point for the enterprise video conferencing market, as there seems to be more need and desire for videoconferencing in the dynamic workplace… We view Vidyo’s ability to virtualize and scale as a significant competitive advantage, one in which we do not believe the traditional, MCU-based [i.e., hardware-based] vendors (Cisco, Polycom, LifeSize, RADVISION, Huawei) will be able to replicate given their hardware-centric architectures.”

According to the Baird Equity Group report the future of video conferencing – over the Internet, from any device, in real time and with real clarity – is available now, with Vidyo.

The Wikipedia entry on disruptive innovation also tells us how this all ends:

“…. Meanwhile, upstart firms inhabit different value networks, at least until the day that their disruptive innovation is able to invade the older value network. At that time, the established firm in that network can at best only fend off the market share attack with a me-too entry, for which survival (not thriving) is the only reward.”

If you followed the latest announcements from the incumbents on what their ‘upcoming’ products will do, you may notice it is the same as what Vidyo has been doing for a while. You can see where we are in the cycle. The market is in transition and Vidyo is leading it.

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Vidyo co-founder and CEO Ofer Shapiro

Ofer co-founded Vidyo in 2005 and pioneered Personal Telepresence, enabling a new generation of software-based natural, multi-point HD video conferences on desktop computers, room systems, and mobile devices. Prior to Vidyo, Ofer spent eight years at RADVISION where he was responsible for the development of the first IP video conferencing bridge and gatekeeper technology and the first commercially successful video conferencing architecture. He also served as senior vice president of business development responsible for strategic sales and relationships. Ofer was a contributor and one of the editors of the H.323 standard. Ofer has over fifteen years of experience in bringing disruptive technologies to market. He holds a Master’s Degree in Applied Physics.

Who’s First? The Race for Mobile Video Conferencing…

…And does it really matter?

      • December 2010 – Elisa service on Galaxy- first mobile service offering
        by a telecom provider on a tab and phone
      • August 2011 – Vidyo’s mobile client is available in the Apple App Store
        delivering multipoint HD videoconferencing for both iPhone and iPad
      • October 2011 – Polycom announces first enterprise HD video software
        solution for tablets

Who was first? Others have called out Polycom for making this false claim.  While Vidyo was both first to demo multipoint video conferencing on a mobile device (January 2010 in Paul Otellini’s CES keynote) as well as deliver multi-party videoconferencing on a smartphone and tablet, the real issue for enterprise decision makers is not about who is first, but about who can deliver a complete solution. With the memory of Steve Jobs still in sharp focus, I’m reminded that it is not about a specific product, but about delivering for the user the most satisfying effortless experience.

With the memory of Steve Jobs still in sharp focus, I’m reminded that it is not about a specific product, but about delivering for the user the most satisfying effortless experience.

In videoconferencing, porting an application to run on a device is only a small part of the requirement—this just delivers the potential for a personal video communication device. Having an intuitive UI for entering and interacting within a videoconference is another part of the experience. But the most important aspect is the actual video interaction that makes the communication experience natural and engaging. The challenge is that mobile devices use wireless networks—WiFi, 3G or 4G—and packets will be dropped and bandwidth may be limited as well as highly variable. And, an enterprise quality solution must be capable of multi-party conferences that enable communication with other mobile devices as well as desktop and room system participants who may encode at far higher resolutions.

Delivering on this challenge requires a completely different infrastructure architecture than what is offered by the old market leaders such as Polycom whose MCU architecture was designed for perfect connectivity such as provided by ISDN, and has now developed Band-Aid approaches including Forward Error Correction, Loss Packet Recovery and others to deal with the Wireless.Wild.West non-guaranteed QoS bandwidth. The result is lackluster performance and increased overhead that further exacerbates the challenging network conditions.

And the bad news gets worse for legacy MCU architectures when it comes to multipoint. When you have a mobile device interacting with another mobile device and an HD room system, the MCU transcodes and gives the gift of additional latency. Since it must transcode to enable disparate devices to be in the same multiparty meeting, it degrades the video quality in the process as well as adds delay. The problem is that for a natural interaction to occur on a mobile device, there just is not any time available for transcoding. Sure you can do it, but the experience is no longer satisfying. You’ll speak over each other, develop a tendency to pause before speaking, and other unnatural behaviors that will make you long for just a phone call or in-person meeting. Clearly, not an “Apple-quality” solution.

Vidyo was built with mobile devices in mind. Vidyo pioneered the use of the recent video compression standard—H.264 SVC— in video conferencing because it enables a latency-free way to adapt to packet loss.  Vidyo created an architecture that intelligently routes packets to each participant’s device based upon the resolution required, computational capability and bandwidth available, and to do so by dynamically adapting many times a second to changing conditions. And in a multiparty conference, it does this without transcoding so it maintains original video quality and adds less than 10msec delay because it makes packet routing decisions with no need to perform complex computational gymnastics. The user experiences natural HD quality multiparty videoconferencing that is engaging.

While this alone differentiates the Vidyo solution, the win for an enterprise deployment is that the Vidyo infrastructure can be deployed for 10% of the cost of the old Polycom MCU architecture. A single 1U VidyoRouter device can support 100 simultaneous participants. VidyoRouters can be geographically deployed to minimize bandwidth consumption. Since Vidyo is a software solution with central capacity license management, the full pool of licenses is available to all VidyoRouters as needed. The result is a dramatically lower number of licenses required to be purchased. And best of all, Vidyo only needs non-guaranteed QoS networks including internal bandwidth. The cost savings of moving away from dedicated video networks may pay for the entire Vidyo infrastructure!

So maybe this is why Polycom resorts to a misleading announcement. It craves for leadership, but it’s saddled with an old architecture that just can’t.

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Marty Hollander

Marty Hollander is Vidyo’s SVP of Market Development. With more than 20 years of high-tech marketing experience, Marty specializes in developing lasting strategic assets through creative market development. Previously, Marty served as Vice President of Marketing at Cemaphore Systems, Latitude Communications (later acquired by Cisco) and ProactiveNet (later acquired by BMC). He also founded CollectiveSpace and IntelliCorp, where he played a variety of executive roles. Marty has also held senior level positions at Silicon Graphics and Storm Technology. Marty earned an MBA from Stanford University as well as an MS from Carnegie-Mellon University.

 

Video Conferencing on the iPad, iPhone and Android Tablets and Smartphones

While VidyoMobile makes it possible to participate in unbelievably high quality multi-party video conferences over the broadband mobile network while you’re barreling down the highway, only do so from the passenger seat! Texting while driving has become a significant road hazard and is responsible for countless accidents—and texting has very limited engagement.  Just imagine how much more difficult it would be to concentrate on driving if you had a natural HD video interaction that made it feel like the participants were sitting in the car with you.

But there are so many other “safe” ways to use VidyoMobile that improves your flexibility to meet people face-to-face, and independently of whether the “far-end” participants are using mobile devices, laptop or desktop computers, SVC or H.323 appliance based room systems, or immersive telepresence systems. Assuming the iPad2 as the platform (and it really is a video conferencing endpoint in tablet clothing), there are three compelling modalities for the use of VidyoMobile.

Desktop Video Phone

VidyoMobile on a docked iPad 2 joining an HD multipoint video conference at 720p with 4 other laptops. (Note: This picture has not been photoshopped in any way.)

One of the nice things about using popular commercially available devices is ready access to low cost and very cool peripherals. Using an off-the-shelf speaker dock, VidyoMobile can turn your iPad2 into a very handy desktop video phone with a slim foot print.  This enables the user to have a stable hands-free experience with rich audio.  Since VidyoMobile supports shared content viewing and the neat zoom in/ zoom out pinch gestures provided by iOS, the collaborative experience is compelling.  And of course, when you are not VidyoConferencing, you can use it to add music to your work environment.

Mobile Access

VidyoMobile on Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 viewing a shared PowerPoint presentation while joining a multipoint video conference with 4 other laptops. (Note: This picture has not been photoshopped in any way.)

Not all mobility happens in cars.  Could be that a doctor wants to walk down the hall to pick up lab results, in which case she could just pull the VidyoMobile device off of the dock and take the conference with her.  Since VidyoMobile on the iPad2 offers the ability to switch between front and rear facing cameras, mobility also means delivering “see what I see” capability into a conference. For a customer support specialist who is showing an engineer in a remote lab a problem on customer site, a process engineer who wants to show the design house a manufacturability issue on the production line, or a biologist in the field showing a rare plant life to a life sciences class half way around the world, this is mobility at its best.  Of course, mobility may also mean face to face interaction from the back of a cab, on board a train or in an airport.

Ad-hoc Room System

VidyoMobile on iPad 2 joining an HD multipoint video conference at 720p with 4 other laptops and a room system. (Note: This picture has not been photoshopped in any way.)

Did you know that there is an optional HDMI dongle for the iPad2?  Even better, the dongle also supports simultaneous connection to power.  So now the same device that you are able to use in a dock as a desktop video phone, and then undock and continue to use in-transit, can now connect to a large screen 1080P display when you get to your destination so that multiple people can participate in the conference from the same location as the VidyoMobile device.  While the conference room is certainly a popular application, just image taking a meeting or connecting with friends and family from your couch with the conference on your living room TV.

So remember, even though VidyoMobile simplifies the user experience to a screen tap to enter a conference with no devices to configure or manage, please don’t video conference while behind the wheel of a car.  There are plenty of other safe and productive ways and opportunities to use VidyoMobile. Besides, with the ability to meet face-to-face with anyone, anytime, from anywhere, you’ll have less reason to be behind the wheel of your car in the first place.

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More info:

- VidyoMobile demonstration on iPad 2: View on YouTube.
- Full VidyoMobile press release: “Vidyo HD Multipoint Video Conferencing App for iPad2, iPhone Available Now”

Vidyo Wins Large Telemedicine Network Deal

The world is changing… and there is, perhaps, no better evidence of the shift in global macro conditions and demographics than in the area of healthcare.  An aging population in western countries, rising medical costs, the push for ubiquitous service offerings to rural areas, the evolution of broadband Internet and mobile broadband, are but a few pronounced changes.  To address these changes, there is a need for innovative technology to meet a variety of new needs and provide better products and services to healthcare practitioners.  Perhaps, above all, these changes demand a shift in the way healthcare is delivered, lower costs and enhanced access to high quality care.

Since we first introduced Vidyo for Healthcare 15 months ago, we have met and worked with many visionary individuals and healthcare groups who are dedicated to furthering telemedicine practices in their respective regions.  Our most recent partnership has been with the Ontario Telemedicine Network, an enterprise that has been pioneering province-wide telemedicine programs for many years. Through this experience, OTN developed a sophisticated management system that covers all aspects of a large scale telemedicine deployment.

Today, with the integration of Vidyo’s technology into their products, OTN is now able to expand its reach beyond their existing thousands of sites to remote clinics, doctors’ home offices and patient homes, adding in the missing link for a complete and comprehensive telemedicine solution, fully integrated and interoperable with their existing managed environment that is based on legacy video conferencing systems.

Vidyo is enabling OTN and other medical organizations to achieve a necessary new level in the delivery of healthcare.  Other partners who are embracing Vidyo for Healthcare include:

Vidyo for Healthcare is a true breakthrough in TeleHealthcare, allowing practitioners to accomplish what could never be done before.  It is the only market solution that affordably extends the reach of healthcare beyond traditional facilities to anywhere with Internet access, connecting practitioners and patients interactively via “off-the-shelf” computers and mobile devices.  We are truly excited to be part of the next generation of global healthcare solutions.

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Amnon Gavish, Vidyo's SVP of Vertical Solutions

Amnon Gavish brings more than 15 years of experience in the telecommunications market. Before joining Vidyo in October 2009, Amnon was the Chief Technology Officer at Keisense Inc., an innovator in the field of textual user interface for Computer Electronics devices. Previously, he served as VP of Business Development at RADVISION, where he was responsible for the company’s strategic partnerships and for the definition of the company’s product offering to the service providers market. Amnon was the CEO and co-Founder of Surf Communications, where he was responsible for all activities, from product inception, through go-to-market strategy, strategic partnerships and sales.

Australian Telemedicine Application Uses Vidyo

Attend Anywhere has been facilitating and managing the exchange of health services via video conference in Australia since 2001. Successful telehealth is a management, facilitation and integration challenge. System wide telehealth also requires an open peer to peer management and facilitation framework.  The Attend Anywhere web based management platform lets people locate services and each other and provides all the business integration, scheduling and management required.

Once doctors and patients have scheduled an appointment, they can join an HD video conferencing call from their laptops or computers, from anywhere, via Vidyo.

 

Secure, individual appointments are set up via the management platform using temporary video rooms that expire after the session is complete.

Many people who are still unfamiliar with Telemedicine are curious to know what it concretely consists of. To help getting a better idea of how video conferencing can be used in healthcare, here is an example of Vidyo and how the Attend Anywhere management platform can be used for chronic disease management.

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tr5cm4oUGs

In 2011 telehealth is set to become a mainstream part of the Australian landscape as changes to government legislation and funding arrangements converge with systemic and business drivers, technology advances and social change. Recently, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard visited Monash University’s Alfred Hospital Campus in Melbourne to view real life applications of the technology to support access to clinical services via VidyoConferencing.

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard attends a demonstration as a consultant physician (in the room) uses his laptop to consult with the patient in the Yarra Valley (top) with input from the surgeon (bottom).

The Prime Minister previously announced that from July 2011 a government funding program of $402.2 million over four years will provide:

– Medicare rebates for online consultations across a range of specialties
– Financial incentives for specialists, GPs and other health professionals to participate in delivering online services
– Expansion of the GP after hours helpline and include the capacity for the helpline to provide online triage and basic medical advice via videoconferencing
– Training and supervision for health professionals using online technologies

The Prime Minister and State Premier chat with patients and clinicians.

Healthcare is about human communication and telehealth heralds a radically evolved health system where traditional face to face services are delivered in the same way, but without travel.  The key is making the option of telehealth easy and sustainable for providers of healthcare services.  This means integrating the capability within everyday workflows and dealing with a range of facilitating considerations.  With the management and integration support offered by Attend Anywhere coupled with natural, HD quality video conferencing provided by Vidyo, telemedicine empowers healthcare professionals and their patients, lowering costs, cutting down on travel, and making personal health support and care affordable and universally available to an ever growing number of people from all over Australia.

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Related Links:

- Boston Globe article: “Partners stroke care going mobile
- Our blog post:
Massachusetts General Hospital Chooses Vidyo’s Technology for Telestroke Program”


Vatican City Selects VidyoConferencing Technology to Ease Communications between Offices of the Holy See

Vatican SealThe Vatican is one of the world’s oldest institutions, keeper of Christian traditions and of thousands of years of history whose roots date back to the 5th century.

One of the objectives of the Vatican in the past few years has been centered around the improvement of communication. The sovereign territory of the Holy See illustrates this shared effort and has deployed VidyoConferencing to enhance interactions between the various locations throughout the organization.

 

Until now, Vatican City had been using traditional communications tools that no longer fulfilled the needs of a growing organization with offices worldwide. The selection of Vidyo’s platform was made by the Telecommunication Department of the city, which oversees the adoption of technologies within the Holy See; they reviewed a variety of different video conferencing solutions during their evaluation.

 

St. Peter's Basilica
St. Peter’s Basilica

The Vatican City’s Telecommunications Department’s objective was to introduce a high-quality, cost-effective, video communications and collaboration platform. Since most of those who would be using the system were not technically savvy, the system needed to be easy to use, access and maintain. Vidyo’s solution was a fit. It will allow anyone in the Vatican City to use video communications easily, even those with less technical knowledge, resulting in a reduction of travel costs and a positive impact on the environment.

For more information about how Vatican City uses VidyoConferencing, read the full press release here!

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Related Links:

- Full Vidyo press release: “Vatican City Selects Vidyo Video Conferencing Technology to Ease Communications between Offices of the Holy See
- Full VidyoRouter Cloud Edition press release: “Vidyo Architecture Offers Unmatched Scalability and Economics for Large Enterprise and Carrier Video Conferencing”